Evil Within 2

Psychologist Sean Keating on the impact of gaming on modern fundraising

Psychologist Sean Keating on the impact of gaming on modern fundraising

When looking at the broad scope of fundraising, you’ll find awkward encounters in your local supermarket, and hear of million dollar fundraisers held by the countries elite. Though one industry oft-overlooked despite it’s record-breaking contributions, is that of gaming.

Responsible for the largest donation by a corporate partner within one year to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, and several other fundraised donations, gamers overseas have had enormous success using live streaming to fundraise.

The trend of “gaming for good” is now beginning to take off in Australia too. Registered psychologist Sean Keating said it’s the community aspect of online gaming which makes it a successful place for fundraising.

“The community-based nature of live streaming events allows individuals to access like-minded peers whilst supporting a good cause,” Mr Keating said.

Gaming has always been followed by negative connotations in the public eye, but the “giving for good” mentality that’s sweeping across the globe is a force of change.

“Building relationships online gives people the opportunity to connect beyond their physical space, while playing or enjoying watching others interact within the gaming world.” Mr Keating said.

Josh Endres, from gaming community group UnrealAussies, recently used the JustGiving platform to raise $5,320 for BeyondBlue during a 10-hour streaming marathon on the Gold Coast in July.

“People don’t realise two-thirds of Australians play video games in their spare time. Now with JustGiving we can do something we love and help charity at the same time.”

JustGiving’s Gaming Partnerships Coordinator Becky Arthur said with around 666 million people watching fan-made video content last year, streaming offered the latest fundraising opportunity for charities.

Evil Within 2